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News and Blog

Microfossil Mania

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

   ...read more

Dinosaurs by Design: Up Close and Personal at the Eromanga Natural History Museum

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

It’s every kid’s dream to come face to face with their favourite dinosaurs. But with 365 million years between then and now that’s been impossible. Until today. In fact, a prehistoric pack of dinosaur have risen again, like a zoological zombie tribe ready to stomp through the arid red outback of South West Queensland once more. And thanks to the Eromanga Natural History Museum, you can meet these big bony fellas in person.  ...read more

Press - Dinosaur history shapes future of drought-ravaged Eromanga

Monday, November 19, 2018

Eromanga Natural History Museum was featured heavily on ABC News. Below is an extract of the article. Use the link to read in full and view the movies.  ...read more

Dinosaur Dig Season 2018

Monday, May 07, 2018

Our Dinosaur Dig Season is starting again soon. Digs starts on the 10th May and run through to the 22nd May. We will be excavating bones from a very large concentration of dinosaur bones. Bone excavated to date is indicating that this is a very large dinosaur!   ...read more

In The Media - Queensland family discover Australia's biggest dinosaur

Friday, April 13, 2018

Robyn and Corey of Eromanga Natural History Museum appeared on Seven’s Sunrise recently discussing recent discoveries and the museum while displaying "Coopers" replica leg bone.   ...read more

Very Eager Volunteers

Tuesday, April 03, 2018

Imagine the mammoth task of being placed in front of a bucket of megafauna mud and being told to find fossils the size of a pin head. Well this was the task ahead for our newest volunteer Steve Young. A commercial photographer from coughs harbor enjoys the small finer things in life, like taking photos of minuscule fungi’s. Luckily for us, Steve wanted to develop he interest in microscopic things and share his skills with us and help build our collection. After two weeks of working through less than a millimeter in size sediments, Steve’s collection of finds was extensive and exciting and including that of a partial lower jaw from a small 100,000-year-old Gekkonid. With a heavy heart Steve left us and will be returning again later in the year.   ...read more

Dino Dig Time Again!

Monday, April 02, 2018

After two years of waiting the ENHM team are back at it again, at the Eromanga Dinosaur Dig. Starting on the 10th of May for 2 weeks we will be hard at work continuing the excavations from our promising new dinosaur Monty. Unveiling of this new dinosaur site began in 2015 and since has seen to become the resting place of the largest concentration of large sauropods in Australia and unearthing another individual representing the largest dinosaurs in Australia. This is not only the first dig since ENHM has been open, but the first Dino Dig that we are taking on paid participants. This once in a life time opportunity gives everyday people the chance to experience life as a Dino Digger, uncovering what lies beneath with a great group of people.  ...read more

Cooper's Life Size Limb Installed

Monday, September 11, 2017

Australia’s largest dinosaur replication - Funds were raised through the generous contribution of supporters of the Crowd Funding campaign and matching funds from Qld Arts, Outback Gondwana Foundation, RADF and Bridgeport.  ...read more

Featured on Queensland Weekender

Monday, August 21, 2017

Eromanga Natural History Museum has recently featured on Queensland Weekender in a 4 part series documenting The Natural Sciences Loop.   ...read more

Interview with Rod Corfe 2WEB Outback Radio and Robyn Mackenzie

Monday, May 08, 2017

Interview with Rod Corfe 2WEB Outback Radio and Robyn Mackenzie.   ...read more


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between megafauna fossils and dinosaur fossils?

Dinosaurs are reptiles that went extinct 64 million years ago. They grew to gigantic sizes.  They lived in a time when Australia was a very different place to what it is today, and part of the ancient landmass called Gondwana. The Eromanga dinosaurs are estimated to be 95-98 million years old and lived during the late Cretaceous.

Megafauna are the group of animals that evolved after the dinosaurs died.  They were very large marsupials, reptiles and flightless birds and went extinct about 20,000 years ago.  Some of their descendants still exist today in much smaller forms such as kangaroos, wombats, komodo dragons and crocodiles.  The Eulo megafauna lived during Pleistocene approximately 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. 


 
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