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Featured on Queensland Weekender

Monday, August 21, 2017

Eromanga Natural History Museum has recently featured on Queensland Weekender in a 4 part series documenting The Natural Sciences Loop.

 


As quoted on Queensland Weekender, August 12, 2017:

The Natural Sciences Loop is a self-guided drive itinerary that kicks off in Charleville and takes in some of Australia’s most remote communities – including Quilpie, Eromanga, Thargomindah and Cunnamulla. Along the way tourists can visit many local attractions that highlight the region’s stunning landscapes and natural history.

The Eromanga Natural History Museum has an incredible collection of dinosaur and mega- fauna fossils dating back almost 100 million years. The museum has become a major tourist attraction in south-west Queensland. It offers various tours so visitors can learn about Australia’s ancient inhabitants. It also has a learning program for kids that trains the palaeontologists of tomorrow.

Right next door is the recently opened Cooper’s Country Lodge. There are 6 studios, including one family suite, and they all offer 4-star outback luxury.

To see all 4 parts of the series and find out more about Queensland Weekender and The Natural Sciences Loop review check out the full Queensland Weekender page titled Charleville to Eromanga.

 




Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between megafauna fossils and dinosaur fossils?

Dinosaurs are reptiles that went extinct 64 million years ago. They grew to gigantic sizes.  They lived in a time when Australia was a very different place to what it is today, and part of the ancient landmass called Gondwana. The Eromanga dinosaurs are estimated to be 95-98 million years old and lived during the late Cretaceous.

Megafauna are the group of animals that evolved after the dinosaurs died.  They were very large marsupials, reptiles and flightless birds and went extinct about 20,000 years ago.  Some of their descendants still exist today in much smaller forms such as kangaroos, wombats, komodo dragons and crocodiles.  The Eulo megafauna lived during Pleistocene approximately 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. 


 
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